Posts in Newsletter
Will he, won't he?

We are in unprecedented times indeed when we find ourselves, time and time again having to contemplate whether the Prime Minister will comply with the law. Contradictory statements are repeatedly emerging from No 10- ‘we will leave on the 31st October come what may but we will also comply with the Benn Act’ (both of which cannot be true at the same time). Only time will tell what comes next, but this week’s ruling from the Scottish Court of Session puts Johnson in a bind.

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A Cunning Plan

The Prime Minister has presented his ideas for a deal to the country and the EU. Will the EU accept them? Can they pass Parliament? Are they even viable? (Spoiler alert: not really). As usual, there are many questions around the future of the UK and EU. The PM also intends to prorogue Parliament again for a Queen’s speech, for 6 days instead of 5 weeks this time. In the midst of all this, the uncertainty of what comes after the 31st October remains. We have therefore published our short guide for you on how to prepare for a no-deal which you can download from our website.

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Back to Business

Another seismic week, one in which it turns out Parliament was never suspended. The unanimous Supreme Court decision declared the prorogation as unlawful. Meanwhile, the EU is increasingly sceptical that a workable deal will be presented by the UK.

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Supremely Troubled

As we’ve said many times before, if there is one thing Brexit has exposed, it is the fragility of the UK’s (uncodified) constitution. What we’ve always been dependent on is the Executive behaving appropriately and not playing fast and loose with the conventions that underpins the UK’s constitution. More on this below, plus the state of the negotiations and the impacts of no-deal on citizens’ rights.

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NewsletterMalene Bratlie
Hammered

So in these highly charged political times and as we face one of the biggest constitutional, political and social crises our Prime Minister has taken the course of least resistance and shut up shop. But whilst parliament may have been prorogued it’s been business as usual for the rest of us. This E: bulletin will focus on the work we have been doing this week, the conversations we’ve been having and what’s on the horizon for civil society.

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Falling Apart at the Seams

Welcome back! This week as seen extraordinary scenes in the Commons. The government defeated time and time again as MPs wrestled control over the parliamentary agenda in their efforts to stop a no-deal exit. Events are as ever moving quickly and this week we're covering MPs working together to try and block no-deal Brexit, the likely upcoming General Election, the Chancellors spending review and Gove and his no-deal preparation.

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NewsletterMalene Bratlie
Special Edition Bulletin: An affront to parliamentary democracy

In an unprecedented move, the government outlined its plan to prorogue (suspend) Parliament for up to five weeks over September and October. This move by the government is, as a number of constitutional experts have said, an affront to parliamentary democracy.

Some commentators and MPs have said that Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament is normal procedure and doesn’t make a huge difference as Parliament was due to have a three-week party conference recess between September and October anyway.

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NewsletterMalene Bratlie
What's that coming over the hill?

At the risk of repeating what we’ve said before, what a week. It’s now officially confirmed that Boris Johnson is the new PM, who said on the steps of No 10 that the UK will leave the EU on October 31, “no ifs or buts.'' Parliament has now promptly left the Westminster village for summer recess. The next three months will be crucial, now is a prime opportunity for organisations to look ahead. Key questions that need answering are whether the UK leaves with a deal, or will we face a cliff-edge exit come October 31st? What about a general election? In this week’s special edition of the Bulletin, we scan the Brexit horizon and attempt to predict the unpredictable.

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